INTERVALS 1 & 2

Intervals 1

The rhythmic elements of Classical Indian Music are Tala, repeating patterns of beats of various emphasis and length. By stringing together single cycles of thirteen well known Tala a twenty-five-bar pattern of beats was created.

Originally the music was composed for standard quintet, the primary cycle of beats being replaced with note lengths of the same pitch. This cycle was then placed in canon for each instrument with a single bar staggering of introduction, with the remaining bars being moved to the beginning of the line.

As the rhythmic pattern is static in terms of its pitch, each instrument was transposed down to form a complete C major chord when all play together. This forms the first section, Conjunction.

The entire first section is then repeated with some new variations, every other note is moved first up and then down a single semi tone, a minor second. This produces a repeating tone interspersed with the minor second but creates new intervals within the entire group of instruments. This forms the second section, Semi Sextile.

The process was then repeated for every interval to encompass Unison to Octave, Conjunction to Opposition and back to Conjunction. During this evolution, the sound of each interval can clearly be heard as an individual characteristic carrying its own specific connotations, it can also be seen how the notes from each instrument begin to overlap. Another aspect of this process is that by using all the intervals, certain movements become discordant as the music slips out of the C Major key and into patches of cacophony.

The cello’s pattern for the Perfect Fifth was then used for the Double Bass by elongating each note to four times its length, producing a hundred bar bass line that was repeated three times before changing to a very quick rhythmic drill during the final cycle of Conjunction II.

Each version has its own appeals and are presented as a two-part work; beginning with the quintet and all intervals included.

 

 

Intervals 2

This is the same construction as Intervals 1 but with the goal of maintaining a piece of music 'in key and harmonious' without losing any of the original pattern. To create a version of the piece that remained in C major, the offending articles were simply struck out entirely, changing the rhythms of different sections in different ways.

Originally the music was composed for standard quintet, the primary cycle of beats being replaced with note lengths of the same pitch. This cycle was then placed in canon for each instrument with a single bar staggering of introduction, with the remaining bars being moved to the beginning of the line.

This “clean” version was then transposed to five vibraphones to examine the fundamentally percussive nature of the work, however, there are certain side effects of this transposition. Mainly in that the range needed seemed beyond the vibraphones and the instruments needed to be brought closer together in terms of their pitch.

Each version has its own appeals and are presented as a two-part work; beginning with the quintet and all intervals included, then finally the vibraphone version that remains in key.